Shaun in the City – The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

120 giant Shaun the Sheep sculptures, which were painted by artists and household names from the worlds of film, art, animation and fashion, grazed green spaces and iconic locations in London and Bristol during spring and summer of 2015.

50 Shaun sculptures were situated around the capital city, London, from the 28th March till the 31st May 2015. From the 6th July till 31st August,  the second flock of entirely different and unique sculptures, were situated around Bristol. In Bristol, we had a Shaun in the City trail. An app was created which showed you the route of the ‘Trail’ which you could follow, in order to find the Shaun statues. As Bristol is quite a large city, the Shaun statues were placed in many different locations, which meant that you could enjoy a day or two out with your family, looking for the sheep statues. Once you had found a Shaun statue, you could note down the code and enter it onto your map. I was able to find two statues whilst out, however, I was unable to go and find the rest.

Melonie Shaun Statue

Melonie Shaun Statue

Melonie Shaun Statue

Melonie Shaun Statue

Melonie Shaun Statue

Melonie Shaun Statue

Bagpuss Shaun Sculpture

Bagpuss Shaun Statue

In Bristol from the 12th – 20th September, the Great Sheep Round Up Exhibition took place. It contained the combined sheep statues from both London and Bristol, 120 in total. This gave everyone a chance to visit the exhibition to view all of the sheep statues together, and to photograph the ones that they may have missed when following the trail. I knew that I had to try to get tickets to the exhibition as I wanted to try to view all of the statues.

I set my alarm early one morning and waited online for the tickets to go on sale. I was extremely fortunate to buy some for myself and my family before they sold out in 20 minutes. I booked tickets for Friday 18th September at 7:30pm.

The Great Round Up Exhibition Tickets

The Great Round Up Exhibition Tickets

The Great Round Up was situated at The Mall Cribbs Causeway. In one of the car parks, they erected a huge pavilion / outdoor tent area. We lined up outside as the staff checked our tickets. As soon as we walked into the tent area, the sheer quantity of Shaun statues took me by surprise. I walked around the indoor tent and photographed every single sculpture. We were given a two-hour slot to view the sculptures and I didn’t think that I would spend that long in there, however, we stayed almost until they were closing. I was fascinated by each sculpture, the details on each statue were amazing and it was great to be able to stand close to them to see the details up close. It must have taken days if not weeks or maybe longer, to paint these statues. They were amazing!

The staff was friendly and were answering questions about the individual sculptures. There was a large number of visitors which attended that evening which is understandable. It was busy at first, so photographing each sculpture was difficult, however, people were pleasant and were allowing you to photograph each sculpture before they did, therefore I had no problem when photographing each Shaun. Towards the end of the evening, the crowd of visitors dwindled, and I was able to take more landscape photographs, which included all of the sculptures.

Below are some screen shots of both the London and Bristol sculptures, from the Shaun in the City website.

http://www.shauninthecity.org.uk/

http://www.shauninthecity.org.uk/shauns?location=bristol

This way, you are able to see the names and front photographs of the statues. I will then upload some of the photographs from my visit to the exhibition.

Bristol Shaun Scultpures

Bristol Shaun Sculptures

Bristol Shaun Sculptures

Bristol Shaun Sculptures

Bristol Shaun Sculptures

Bristol Shaun Sculptures

Bristol Shaun Sculptures

Bristol Shaun Sculptures

Bristol Shaun Sculptures

Bristol Shaun Sculptures

Bristol Shaun Sculptures

Bristol Shaun Sculptures

Bristol Shaun Sculptures

Bristol Shaun Sculptures

London Shaun Sculptures

London Shaun Sculptures

London Shaun Sculptures

London Shaun Sculptures

London Shaun Sculptures

London Shaun Sculptures

London Shaun Sculptures

London Shaun Sculptures

London Shaun Sculptures

London Shaun Sculptures

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

Woolly Jumbo Shaun

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition - Bristol

The Great Round Up Exhibition – Bristol

Choosing a favourite sculpture is extremely hard as they were all fantastic and if I could, I would have chosen them all, however, if I had to choose my favourite Bristol Sheep sculptures were the Bagpuss Shaun, Air Fleece Shaun, Great West Shaun, Star Bake Shaun, Woolly Wonderland and Shear – Lock Holmes Shaun. My Favourite London Sheep sculptures were the Another one Rides the Bus Shaun, Happy & Glorious Shaun, Woolly Jumbo Shaun, To Sheep Perchance to Dream Shaun and The Guardian,  Chelsea Pen-Shaun-er Shaun and Kanzashi Shaun.

Happy & Glorious Shaun

Happy & Glorious Shaun

Happy & Glorious Shaun

Happy & Glorious Shaun

Happy & Glorious Shaun

Happy & Glorious Shaun

Happy & Glorious Shaun

Happy & Glorious Shaun

Air Fleece Shaun

Woolly Jumbo Shaun

Air Fleece Shaun

Woolly Jumbo Shaun

Woolly Jumbo Shaun

Woolly Jumbo Shaun

Star Bake Shaun

Star Bake Shaun

Star Bake Shaun

Star Bake Shaun

Air Fleece Shaun

Air Fleece Shaun

Air Fleece Shaun

Air Fleece Shaun

Air Fleece Shaun

Air Fleece Shaun

Woolly Wonderland Shaun

Woolly Wonderland Shaun

Woolly Wonderland Shaun

Woolly Wonderland Shaun

Woolly Wonderland Shaun

Woolly Wonderland Shaun

Woolly Wonderland Shaun

Woolly Wonderland Shaun

Another one Rides the Bus Shaun

Another one Rides the Bus Shaun

Another one Rides the Bus Shaun

Another one Rides the Bus Shaun

Another one Rides the Bus Shaun

Another one Rides the Bus Shaun

Another one Rides the Bus Shaun

Another one Rides the Bus Shaun

On Thursday 8th October 2015, the sculptures went under the hammer in a grand auction hosted by Sotheby’s auctioneer Tim Wonnacott. This gave everyone an opportunity to bid and win a Shaun statue to take home. Each statue sold, raised money which would help sick children in hospitals across the UK. The proceeds from the London sculptures sold, would go to The Wallace & Gromit’s Children Charity, which supports children’s hospitals and hospices throughout the UK. The proceeds from the Bristol sculptures sold, would go to The Grand Appeal, which funds life-saving care, pioneering medical equipment, facilities, and comforts for patients at Bristol Children’s Hospital. I was in two minds as to bid on one of the large sculptures, however, I couldn’t afford the prices they went for. In total, the money raised from the sale of all 120 sheep sculptures raised over £1Million for charity which is absolutely fantastic!

Like me, if you were unable to bid on one of these giant sculptures, you could purchase a mini Shaun sculpture instead. On the Shaun in the City website, they have an online shop with a variety of products which are sold for charity. They have produced mini replicas of some of the popular larger Shaun sculptures. I was surprised by my mother, who purchased me two of the mini sculptures.

Shaun the Sheep Figurine

Shaun the Sheep Figurine

Star Bake Shaun - Shaun the Sheep Figurine

Star Bake Shaun – Shaun the Sheep Figurine

Star Bake Shaun - Shaun the Sheep Figurine

Star Bake Shaun – Shaun the Sheep Figurine

Star Bake Shaun - Shaun the Sheep Figurine

Star Bake Shaun – Shaun the Sheep Figurine

Happy & Glorious - Shaun the Sheep Figurine

Happy & Glorious – Shaun the Sheep Figurine

Happy & Glorious - Shaun the Sheep Figurine

Happy & Glorious – Shaun the Sheep Figurine

Happy & Glorious - Shaun the Sheep Figurine

Happy & Glorious – Shaun the Sheep Figurine

Happy & Glorious - Shaun the Sheep Figurine

Happy & Glorious – Shaun the Sheep Figurine

Happy & Glorious - Shaun the Sheep Figurine

Happy & Glorious – Shaun the Sheep Figurine

These sculptures were hand-made and hand painted, with every detail just as amazing as the giant one.

I really enjoyed The Great Round Up exhibition. Being able to see all of the combined sculptures from London and Bristol was great. Every sculpture was amazing and I was amazed by the details on each one. I am pleased that I was able to visit these sculptures and that my money and the money raised will help hospitals all over the UK.

Sources:

  • Shaun in the City Shaun Sculptures

http://www.shauninthecity.org.uk/

http://www.shauninthecity.org.uk/shauns?location=bristol

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Project: Dynamic Range

In the last couple of exercises, we looked at what are generally considered the two most pressing technical issues in exposing, for a digital photograph, highlight clipping and noise. They are at opposite ends of the tonal scale, and they define what is known as the ‘Dynamic Range’ of a camera. In earlier days, the range between dark and bright was often called the contrast range, however, it is now known as dynamic range, as this is more accurate.

There are several ways of measuring the dynamic range, however, the most easiest for a photographer is in the form of F-stops. The dynamic range of a scene, is therefore the number of F-stops between the brightest highlight, and the darkest shadow. The dynamic range of a camera is  the number of F-stops it can capture in one exposed frame. If the dynamic range of your camera is greater than the scene you are about to photograph, all is well and there should be no problem capturing the visible detail. If, on the other hand, the camera’s range is less than that of the scene, something has to be lost. This is the cause of most exposure problems.

As the dynamic range is between darkest and brightest that can be captured, we need to find the end points. The easier of the two is the brightest. Using the highlight clipping warning, we are able to find the exposure which captures the brightest point. Noise determines the darkest tone that can be captured. If you look in the very dark shadows of an image, where most of the noise is, there is a point at which it is impossible to distinguish between noise and real detail. In order to see this clearly, it is necessary to lighten the image temporarily in Photoshop. There are however, disagreements over this, which explains why different dynamic ranges appear for the same camera, depending on who is deciding.

 

 

Exercise: Your Tolerance for Noise

For this exercise, you were asked to find a situation that fulfils the following criteria.

  • Daylight indoors ( For the amount of light – outdoor sunlight would be too bright to allow high ISO settings, while much darker would involve long time exposures)
  • A combination of sharp detail and texture less areas ( Such as a white wall ) with some of the texture less area in shadow.

Set the camera on a tripod.

Start by taking a series of identical photographs, changing the ISO setting from one to the next.

Use the aperture priority setting so that there will be no difference in depth of field. My camera was set to F.4 and the ISO ranged from 100-6400

I decided to use the morning light, and photograph my wardrobe door, as it is white, and situated right next to my bedroom window. I stuck a black chandelier sticker onto it, as this was detailed and would help with showing noise.

I have included the original image, and a cropped section where I have zoomed in, to show the noise.

ISO 100:

Clear Image

ISO 100 (1)   ISO 100 (2)

ISO 200:

Clear Image

ISO 200 (1)   ISO 200 (2)

ISO 400:

A clear image, but a small amount of noise has been introduced.

ISO 400 (1)    ISO 400 (2)

ISO 800:

Noticeable noise, especially towards the top of the image where there is some shadow. You can begin to see noise in the dark shadow areas also.

ISO 800 (1)   ISO 800 (2)

 

ISO 1600:

Noticeable noise all over the image

ISO 1600 (1)    ISO 1600 (2)

 

ISO 3200:

Noticeable noise all over the image. More noticeable towards the top and in the shadow area.

ISO 3200 (1)   ISO 3200 (2)

 

ISO 6400:

Noticeable noise all over the image.

ISO 6400 (1)   ISO 6400 (2)

 

I will put the cropped images next to the ISO 100 and then I can compare them easier.

                               ISO 100                                                                           ISO 200

ISO 100 (2)    ISO 200 (2)

                                 ISO 100                                                                       ISO 400

ISO 100 (2)    ISO 400 (2)

                                  ISO 100                                                                       ISO 800

ISO 100 (2)      ISO 800 (2)

                                 ISO 100                                                                        ISO 1600

ISO 100 (2)      ISO 1600 (2)

                               ISO 100                                                                           ISO 3200

ISO 100 (2)     ISO 3200 (2)

                              ISO 100                                                                          ISO 6400

ISO 100 (2)    ISO 6400 (2)

When looking at the images magnified, I can see that with ISO 100 and ISO 200, the images are clear. With ISO 400, graininess begins appearing in the top area of the image, however, it is still usable as the detail on the sticker itself if clear. When I got to ISO 800, there is noticeable, yet faint, noise all over the image. The detail on the sticker is becoming less sharp. ISO 1600, the noise is increasing. With ISO 3200 and ISO 6400, there is significant noise all over the image, but it is worse towards the top of the image, where there seems to be a shadow, as the noise is more noticeable there. The detail on the sticker is blurred and not sharp. These images would be unusable. In my opinion, the best ISO to use in order to have less noise in your image is between ISO 100 and ISO 400. Any ISO after 400, you will begin to see noise in your image, even if you use a fast shutter speed.

 

 

 

 

Project: Linear Capture

In order to appreciate the different way in which a sensor responds to light, as opposed to film, we need to go behind the scenes in the processing software.

Camera Sensor:

The camera sensor reacts to light falling on it in a very basic way. It is known as ‘Linear’.

When you take your photograph, as soon as you press the shutter button, the exposure begins. The more light that falls onto the sensor, the stronger the response, at exactly the same rate, from dark to very bright. The camera uses millions of tiny light cavities or “Photosites” to record an image. Photosites collect and store photons. Once your exposure has finished, the camera will close the Photosites, and will begin assessing how many of the photons have fallen onto each. Photons have various intensity levels, which then determine Bit Depth (0 – 255 for an 8-bit image).

However, the process above will only create a grey scale image due to the cavities not being able to distinguish how much of each colour they have collected. In order to capture colour images, each cavity will have a filter placed over the top. These filters will allow only certain colours to penetrate them.

Most current digital cameras, can only capture one of three primary colours in each cavity. 2/3 of incoming light is discarded. The camera must then approximate the other two primary colours, in order to have full colour at every pixel. The colour filter array is called ‘Bayer Array’.

Bayer Array (Colour Filter)

bayer array

A Bayer array consists of alternating rows of red-green and green-blue filters. There are twice as many green as red or blue sensors. Each primary colour doesn’t receive an equal fraction of the total area because the human eye is more sensitive to green light than both red and blue light. Having more green pixels, produces an image which appears less noisy and will have finer detail, which could not be achieved if each colour was treated equally.

The Human Eye, and Film:

Film mimics the human eye when it comes to responding to light. Both compress the way they receive light, in such a way that ‘twice as bright’ for example, seems less than it really is. This is valuable, as it means that our eyesight can cope easily with a wide range of brightness, without driving our sensory system into overload. The film, to a lesser extent, does the same. Not so a camera sensor. It may seem strange as when you take your photograph, they appear exactly as you would expect them to. However, this is due to the camera performing some strong processing procedures before you get your first glimpse of the final result. If we turn off the in camera processing, you would see that the image you first captured is infact surprisingly dark.

Gamma:

The term ‘Gamma’ is often used to describe digital images, in computing. When applied to monitor screens, it is a measure of the relationship between voltage input and the brightness intensity, and because of the way a computer display works, a raw, uncorrected digital image would look darker and more contrasty than out eyes would find normal.

To compensate for this, Gamma correction is applied inside the camera after capture.

References:

Digital Photography Master Class, Tom Ang, Dorling Kindersley Limited, London 2008. Page 164

ISBN: 9781409333906

http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/tutorials/camera-sensors.htm

Online PDF, Raw Capture, Linear Gamma, and Exposure,  by Bruce Fraser. Adapted from his book Real World Camera Raw, published by Peachpit Press, in August, 2004.

https://www.adobe.com/digitalimag/pdfs/linear_gamma.pdf